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Family Friendly High Raw Vegan Sample Menu: Week 2

17 Oct

“Meat and milk really matter. 

Reduced consumption could

decrease the future emissions of nitrous oxide and methane from agriculture

to levels below those of 1995.” 

~ Alexander Popp of Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research ~

 

Hubby and Son are still on the Vegan Wagon!  Here is our Family Friendly High Raw Vegan Sample Menu Week 2.  You will notice that breakfast in our house is typically the same as last week’s menu.  My boys love certain Raw Vegan Meals for Breakfast and although I have tried to experiment and veer away from Raw Oatmeal, Fruit Pudding and Granola, these are their faves.  Please try out others to see what your family might like too.

Some Recipes for you:

Raw Drinks: smoothies, juices, limeade

Raw Breakfast: Oatmeal, Fruit Pudding (my favourite one is the Green Sundae!), Granola

Raw Dishes: Collard Green Noodle Salad, Marinated Mushrooms, Curried Vegetables, Kale Salad, B12 Salad, your choice of other  Salads

Cooked Vegan Dishes: Chinese Stir-Fry from The Happy Herbivore, Paella from Whole Foods Recipes (use whole tomatoes instead if you prefer and by the way, I love their APP. Their Vegan Soups are so much better than Epicurious Vegan Soups!), Maple Baked Beans (I use maple syrup instead of molasses – although molasses is a good source of iron if you want to use that instead – and I’m trying to wean my boys from canned tomato sauce by substituting with raw applesauce),  Shepherd’s Pie and Refried Beans from How it all Vegan!, Chocolate Chip Cookies from Vegan Diner (these are the best we’ve tasted and one of the healthiest! I substitute my home milled spelt flour for all purpose flour, Sucanat from brown sugar, coconut oil for canola, water for milk, whole flax meal for golden… still YUM!), 5 minute Vegan Pancakes from the wonderful web (just substitute Sucanat for sugar, coconut oil for vegetable and raw almond milk for soymilk), homemade Wheat Tortillas recipe from Anson Mills (although I use my own home milled flour).

Carissa’s Cooked Vegan Recipes:

Tempeh Joes: Our most fast food and processed dish ever… I’m scared to write this on here… but I wanted to let you know that I’m not the perfect Mama in the Kitchen sometimes too… and to let you know that sometimes the boys just want certain foods now and this is better than going to some fast food joint to get their ‘fix’.  No other substitute for the meat in this works for them… and no other ‘sauce’ is faster than organic ketchup.  Steam 2 packages of Wild Rice Tempeh (if anyone has a better non-soy substitute, please let me know!) for 10-15 minutes.  Grate to resemble meat.  Saute 1 diced onion in olive oil, add grated tempeh, stir-fry for a few minutes and then add ketchup to coat.  Add Nama Shoyu or Bragg’s Amino if desired.  Serve with loads of raw veggies on the side (corn, avocado and tomatoes work well!).

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Family Friendly High Raw Vegan Sample Menu: Week 1

10 Oct

  “Tell me and I’ll forget;

show me and I may remember;

involve me and I’ll understand.”

~ Chinese proverb ~

After watching Forks Over Knives together, discovering that our healthy non-smoker loved one had Cancer in the lungs and attending an equally entertaining and persuasive Vegan-centric Nutrition lecture by Dr. Greger (his videos are fantastic!) together at the D.C. VegFest, my husband for the past month has requested that we eat only Vegan meals. This is a HUGE step for him, as he is an Omnivore.  While my boys continue to eat 50% Raw Vegan foods, now for the past month their cooked foods have been ALL Vegan as well.

A few nights ago, it seemed to me that my husband was losing his zeal for all the Vegan food he has been consuming and I asked him, “Are you missing meat?”

“Yes,” he replied.

“Do you want me to cook some meat for you?” I offered.

“No. Can you bake some Chocolate Chips Cookies though?”

It is clear to me that my husband is going through some type of withdrawal at this point on his Vegan journey.  So for the past month, this Raw Vegan Mama has been cooking up a Vegan storm… selfishly because I don’t want my Omnivore Hubby to lose sight of the Vegan light!  I guess the events of the past month have affected him more than he lets on… as Robert Kegan states so well:

 

“What the eye sees better the heart feels more deeply.

We not only increase the likelihood of our being moved;

we also run the risk that being moved entails.

Seeing increases our vulnerability to being recruited to the welfare of another.”

~ Robert Kegan, The Evolving Self ~

I like to think my efforts in the kitchen are working because my husband even agreed to embark on a 1 month trial Vegan menu for our family this month (yes, yet another month of Vegan food for Omnivore Hubby and Son!).

For many out there who have wanted Sample Menus and for Elizabeth who just commented on Peace @ the Healthy Table: What Does It Take?, here’s the first week’s menu for you:

Family Friendly High Raw Vegan Sample Menu Week 1

Some Recipes for you:

Raw Drinks: smoothies, juices, flavored water

Raw Breakfast: Oatmeal, Fruit Pudding (my favourite one is the Green Sundae!), Granola

Raw Dishes: Kale Salad, your choice of  Salads, Guacamole and other sides for Burger

Cooked Vegan Dishes: Shepherd’s Pie and Mulligatawny Soup is from  How it all Vegan!, Potpie from Meatless Meals for Working People, Black Beans and Rice from Forks Over Knives (NOTE: I use coconut oil for vegetable oil, my own milled flour and other unprocessed ingredients to substitute for some ingredients in these books)

Carissa’s Cooked Vegan Recipes:

Portabello Burger: simply marinate mushrooms in a Balsamic Vinaigrette with basil for 10 minutes and roast/grill on both sides for 5 minutes

Vegan Alfredo: heat 4 tbspns coconut oil on medium heat, add 3 – 4 tbspns spelt or whole wheat flour, stir for a minutes, add ‘milk’ (blend 2 cups water, 3 tbspns raw almond butter, 4 tsp maple syrup, 1 tsp sea salt and 2 pinches nutmeg together) and cook until thickens.  Add to pasta.  Top with Nutritional Yeast, if desired.

Waffles: Mix in a bowl 4 cups spelt/wheat flour, 2 tsp sea salt and 1 tsp baking soda. Mix in another bowl or blender 1 tsp apple cider vinegar, 1/4 cup flax meal, 1/4 cup water, 1/4 cup raw almond butter, 1/2 cup melted coconut oil and 3 1/2 cups water.  Mix dry into wet ingredients and cook with waffle maker.

Apple Crumble (adapted from my mother-in-law’s friends recipe): Place 10 apples, peeled and sliced, in a slightly greased dish.  Top with juice of 1 orange and cinnamon.  In another bowl, mix together 150 grams coconut oil, 1 cup Sucanat, 1 cup of your choice of flour (1/2 cup whole wheat and 1/2 cup wheat germ or 1 cup spelt).  Place this mixture on top of apples and bake at 350F for 30 minutes.

Sweet Potato Fries: Slice them, coat with some olive oil, salt and/or Sucanat and cinnamon and bake them!

Hospital Feeds Cancer Patient Animal Based Meals and Processed Foods

19 Sep

Free Drinks for family or friends at the Hospital in the Surgical Waiting Room

What’s Wrong with Animal Based Foods and Processed Foods?

If you’ve watched the recent documentary Forks Over Knives, which is now available in DVD or on Amazon Instant Video or on Netflix, the message from highly respected and reputed doctors (Dr. T. Colin Campbell, Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Dr. John McDougall, Dr. Pam Popper, Dr. Dough Lisle, Dr. Terry Mason, Dr. Neal Barnard and Drs. Matthew Lederman and Alona Pulde) is clear and simple:

  • the quantity of animal based foods and processed foods consumption is directly correlated to degenerative diseases, especially heart disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity and even erectile disfunction.
  • animal protein has shown that its addition into the diet alone can turn on and off cancer.
  • a whole foods plant based diet has the power to cure many diseases.
  • a whole foods plant based diet has the power to prevent many diseases.

Hospital Serves Cancer Patient Animal Based Meals and Processed Foods

Would you give an alcoholic a bottle of wine?  Would you temp someone who just quit smoking with a cigarette?  Then why do hospitals serve Cancer patients, and other patients who are struggling with health and possibly life itself, processed foods and animal products – the very foods that cause disease in the first place?

Last week, someone very close to my heart had a lung operation to remove cancer cells.  While I was undoubtedly saddened by the news, I was appalled at what kind of food was served to her at the hospital.  And this was in a very well known and respected hospital!

Her very first and subsequent drink offers at the hospital:

  • ginger ale with high fructose corn syrup with loads of ice
  • cranberry juice from a plastic tub (the kind that makes the juice taste like plastic)
  • apple juice concentrate from Argentina and China.

She also noted that she had quite a difficult time getting the nurses to give her just plain water without ice.

Her very first meal was breakfast:

  • oatmeal (the healthiest choice on the tray)
  • French toast
  • 2 pieces of greasy bacon (after surgery? really?) and 
  • canned fruit.

Lunch:

  • turkey and gravy
  • mashed potatoes (with butter?),
  • green beans and grapes (at least!).

Dinner:

  • beef stew and
  • broccoli (another at least!).

Snacks: Family and friends were offered ice cream, which was full of  artificial ingredients except for the first ingredient, milk.

The total ignorance in choices offered by the hospital’s food service is appalling but not really surprising.  I remind myself, this is probably how many people eat.  This is considered normal food.  But it is wrong on so many levels.

What To Do To Change What Hospitals Feed Patients?

While many of us are unable to make drastic changes to hospital food services, we can make our choices known!

For family and friends of patients, bring better options for your loved ones:

  • filtered water
  • raw healthy juices
  • fruits and
  • easily digested vegetables (i.e. pureed soups).

For patients: ask the hospital staff if they have Vegan options.

The China Study

6 Oct

Despite its reputation for pies, BBQ pork, lard and fried foods,
the South is a great place for local and organic fresh produce!

The China Study diet is possible anywhere!


I was disappointed with the book called Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human and I now know why after reading The China Study (click here for book). A deeper discussion in Catching Fire about the unhealthiness of human beings today was missing. Such a discussion and more importantly proof that even if ‘cooking made us human’, what we eat today has led us to numerous diseases. In The China Study, we are introduced to, as the New York Times called, “the most comprehensive large study ever undertaken of the relationship between diet and the risk of developing disease”. In his book, Dr. T. Colin Campbell clearly states that certain foods cause certain diseases and he suggests a proper diet and nutrition for all.
Although I am a raw vegan, my family still wants to eat meat, poultry, dairy and eggs. Although I buy organic, grass-fed, no antibiotics/hormones, no rGBH, free range, etc… for them, according to The China Study this makes little difference as the animal-based proteins are the cause for many diseases. Furthermore, diseases like cancer can actually be turned off and on according to how much animal-based proteins one consumes! Not the only book out there, but certainly a relatively new book and with hefty credentials, The China Study gives me the scientific proof I need to work on my family’s diet and persuade them why there is a healthier way to eat. As Dr. Campbell quotes Hippocrates: There are, in effect, two things: to know and to believe one knows. To know is science. To believe one knows is ignorance. One would think everyone would prefer to know and act on what they know.
Did you know that half of Americans have health problems that require taking a prescription drug every week and that authors of a major review on diet and cancer, prepared for the U.S. congress in 1981, estimated that genetics only determines about 2 – 3% of the total cancer risk? WOW – anyway, read on please… this information is astounding.

Some excerpts from the book:
… you deserve to know that many of the common notions you have been told about food, health and disease are wrong:
– Synthetic chemicals in the environment and in your food, as problematic as they may be, are not the main cause of cancer.
– The genes that you inherit from your parents are not the most important factors in determining whether you fall prey to any of the ten leading causes of death.
– The hope that genetic research will eventually lead to drug cures for diseases ignores more powerful solutions that can be employed today.
– Obsessively controlling your intake of any one nutrient, such as carbohydrates, fat, cholesterol or omega-3 fats, will not result in long-term health.
– Vitamins and nutrient supplements do not give you long-term protection against disease.
– Drugs and surgery don’t cure the diseases that kill most Americans
– Your doctor probably does not know what you need to do to be the healthiest you can be.

There are over 750 references in this book, and the vast majority of them are primary sources of information, including hundreds of scientific publications from other researchers that point the way to less cancer, less heart disease, fewer strokes, less obesity, less diabetes, less autoimmune disease, less osteoporosis, less Alzheimer’s, less kidney stones and less blindness.
Some of the findings, published in the most reputable scientific journals, show that:
– Dietary change can enable diabetic patients to go off their medication.
– Heart disease can be reversed with diet alone.
– Breast cancer is related to levels of female hormones in the blood, which are determined by the foods we eat.
– Consuming dairy foods can increase the risk of prostrate cancer.
– Antioxidants, found in fruits and vegetables, are linked to better mental performance in old age.
– Kidney stones can be prevented by a healthy diet.
– Type 1 diabetes, one of the most devastating diseases that can befall
a child, is convincingly linked to infant feeding practices.
(Solutions to) these issues all come down to three things: breakfast, lunch and dinner.
It was widely thought that much of the childhood malnutrition in the world was caused by a lack of protein, especially from animal based foods. Universities and governments around the world were working to alleviate a perceived “protein gap” in the developing world.
… In this (Philippine) project, however, I uncovered a dark secret. Children who ate the highest-protein diets were the ones most likely to get liver cancer! They were the children of the wealthiest families.
I then noticed a research report from India… Indian researchers had studied two groups of rats. In one group, they administered the cancer-causing aflatoxin, then fed a diet that was composed of 20% protein, a level near what many of us consume in the West. In the other group, they administered the same amount of aflatoxin, but then fed a diet that was only composed of 5% protein. Incredibly, every single animal that consumed the 20% protein diet had evidence of liver cancer, and every single animal that consumed a 5% protein diet avoided liver cancer. It was a 100 to 0 score, leaving no doubt that nutrition trumped chemical carcinogens, even very potent carcinogens, in controlling cancer.
… I decided to start an in-depth laboratory program that would investigate the role of nutrition, especially protein, in the development of cancer… What we found was shocking. Low-protein diets inhibited the initiation of cancer by aflatoxin, regardless of how much of this carcinogen was administered to these animals. After cancer initiation was completed, low-protein diets also dramatically blocked subsequent cancer growth. In other words, the cancer-producing effects of this highly carcinogenic chemical were rendered insignificant by a low-protein diet. In fact, dietary protein proved to be so powerful in ts effect that we could turn on and turn off cancer growth simply by changing the level consumed.
…But that’s not all… What protein consistently and strongly promoted cancer? Casein, which makes up 87% of cow’s milk protein, promoted all stages of the cancer process. What type of protein did not promote cancer, even at high levels of intake? The safe proteins were from plants, including wheat and soy.
… people who ate the most animal-based foods got the most chronic disease. Even relatively small intakes of animal-based food were associated with adverse effects. People who ate the most plant-based foods were the healthiest and tended to avoid chronic disease… The findings are consistent.
So, what is my prescription for good health? In short, it is about the multiple health benefits of consuming plant-based foods, and the largely unappreciated health dangers of consuming animal-based foods, including all types of meat, dairy and eggs.
One of the more exciting benefits of good nutrition is the prevention of diseases that are thought to be due to genetic predisposition. WE now know that we can largely avoid these “genetic” diseases even though we may harbor the gene (or genes) that is (are) responsible for the disease.
… Furthermore, a pattern was beginning to emerge: nutrients from animal-based foods increased tumor development while nutrients from plant-based foods decreased tumor development.
…despite any short-term caloric restriction regimes we may follow, our body, through many mechanisms, will ultimately choose how many calories to take in and what to do with them. Our attempts to limit calorie intake is short-lived and imprecise, whether we do it by limiting carbohydrates or fat.
… But what if you want to become bigger? A desire to be as big as possible is pervasive in most cultures… Body size seems to be a mark of prowess, manliness and dominance.
Most people think they can be bigger and stronger by eating protein-rich animal-based foods. This belief stems from the idea that consuming protein (aka meat) is needed for physical power. This has been a common notion the world over for a long time… There is, however, a problem with the idea that consuming animal-based foods is a good way of becoming bigger. The people who eat the most animal protein have the most heart disease, cancer and diabetes… Furthermore, body weight, associated with animal protein intake, was associated with more cancer and more coronary heart disease. It seems that being bigger, and presumably better, comes with very high costs. But might it be possible for us to achieve our full growth potential, while simultaneously minimizing disease risk?
Childhood growth rates were not measured in the China Study but adult height and weight were. This information proved surprising. Consuming more protein was associated with greater body size (for men and women). However, this effect was primarily attributed to plant protein, because it makes up 90% of the total Chinese protein intake… But the good news is this: Greater plant protein intake was closely linked to greater height and body we
ight. Body growth is linked to protein in general and both animal and plant proteins were effective!
… So why is it that people in developing nations, who consume little or no animal-based foods, are consistently smaller than Western people? This is because…of… insufficient variety, inadequate quantity and quality and are associated with poor public health conditions…
So there is a solution to the weight-gain problem. But how can you apply it to your own life?
First of all, throw away ideas about counting calories… Secondly… feeling hungry is a sign that something is wrong, and prolonged hunger causes your body to slow the overall rate of metabolism in defense. Moreover, there are mechanisms in our bodies that naturally allow the right kind of plant-based foods to nourish us, without our having to think about every morsel of food we put in our mouths. It is a worry free way to eat. Give your body the right food and it will do the right thing… studies document the fact that vegetarians consume the same amount or even significantly more calories than their meat-eating counterparts, and yet are still slimmer.
A plant-based diet operates on calorie balance to keep body weight under control in two ways. First, it discharges calories as body heat instead of storing them as body fat… Second, a plant-based diet encourages more physical activity. And, as body weight goes down, it becomes easier to be physically active.
~ ~ ~
Eating Right: Eight Principles of Food Health
#1 Nutrition represents the combined activities of countless food substances. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.
#2 Vitamin supplements are not a panacea for good health. (Except daily B12 supplements for vegetarians and vitamin D for those who spend most time indoors or live in the northern climates.)
#3 There are virtually no nutrients in animal-based foods that are not better provided by plants.
#4 Genes do not determine disease on their own. Genes function only by being activated, or expressed, and nutrition plays a critical role in determining which gens, good and bad, are expressed.
#5 Nutrition can substantially control the adverse effects of noxious chemicals.
#6 The same nutrition that prevents disease in its early stages (before diagnosis) can also halt or reverse disease in its later stages (after diagnosis)
#7 Nutrition that is truly beneficial for one chronic disease will support health across the board.
#8 Good nutrition creates health in all areas of our existence. All parts are interconnected.
Eat All You Want (While Getting Lots of Variety) of Any Whole, Unrefined Plant-Based Food: FRUITS, VEGETABLES (including flowers, stems and leaves, roots, legumes, mushrooms, nuts) and WHOLE GRAINS.
Minimize: refined carbohydrates, added vegetable oils, fish.
Avoid: meat, poultry, dairy and eggs.